Tag Archives: ask and answered

Worried about your Future ~ Read this

Yesterday a lady was worried about her home and it’s possession and here the card from Kabala…..

heh

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Hinenni
(“Here I Am”)

 Moses was shepherding the sheep of Jethro, his father-in-law, the priest of Midian; he guided the sheep far into the wilderness, and he arrived at the Mountain of God, toward Horeb.

An angel of God appeared to him in a blaze of fire amid the bush. He saw, and behold! The bush was burning in the fire but the bush was not consumed. Moses thought, “I will turn aside now and look at this great sight—why will the bush be not burned?” God saw that he had turned aside to see; and God called out to him from amid the bush and said, “Moses, Moses!” and he replied, “Here I am!”

    The episode of the burning bush signifies the beginning of the Exodus from Egypt simply because it is the event that makes Moses into a prophet, completing his personal transition.

Moses went from being an orphaned infant (when his mother put him in a basket in the Nile river to save him from Pharaoh’s evil decree against all male Hebrew babies), to a prince (having been adopted by the Pharaoh’s daughter and raised in the palace), to a shepherd (when he becomes aware of his true identity and runs away from Egypt, joining Jethro in Midian and marrying his daughter), to finally becoming the great leader we know—the liberator—at this moment in the wilderness.
Just as he had to go through many transitions and changes in his life before he was ready to fulfill his destiny of freeing the Jewish people from slavery, Moses’ prophecy itself has several stages: (1) He goes out into the wilderness; (2) he sees an angel; (3) he notices that the bush is on fire but is not consumed, and (4) only then does the voice of God make itself heard. And when God speaks to Moses, He has to say his name twice, so that Moses will be sure that what he’s hearing is real, and not just a figment of his imagination.
After all of these stages of increasing awareness, Moses replies, simply, “Hinneni”(“Here I am”), the same word used by Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in their times of prophecy.
The direct reply may seem startling—after all, God obviously knows that Moses is “there” or He would not have revealed Himself. But when you think about it, it makes perfect sense: Moses needed to make sure that this was real— he needed to look in the direction of the bush; clarify what was happening; hear his name being called; and affirm that, yes, he was ready to receive the message that would now be sent to him, and would accomplish the task that would soon be set out before him. His whole life has been a slow building-up to this point: where he could acknowledge his own powers and answer God directly, entering into a dialogue with Him that would not only change the course of history, but change the prophet’s own life completely.

Bible commentators point out that the spot on which the burning bush appeared to Moses was actually the same spot on which the Torah would be given many years later—Mt. Sinai.

The fact that Moses’ first awakening to his role as a prophet and his most important task in that role happened on the same spot is not accidental.

Just as Moses needed to acknowledge his place in this epic story, so will every single one of his followers need to acknowledge themselves at the giving of the Torah and the Revelation that comes along with it.

The letter Heh corresponds to the number five, which is also the number of physical senses we’re given at birth: sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. But there’s a sixth sense, too: the one we associate with spirituality, which can only be accomplished on our own, through our own journeys to new levels of awareness and emotional depth. This is the sixth sense that Moses acknowledges at the burning bush, and it is that sense that will help him through all the trials and tribulations of leading a people out of slavery and into freedom.
In order to reach that sixth sense, we learn from the word Hinneni, we must first master the original five senses, getting to know ourselves in our literal, physical states and eventually learning how to get beyond that limited world to the miraculous world that lies above and beyond.

The Heh card comes to you at moments of transition and significant personal growth. You may be moving from one phase of your life into another, reaching a certain landmark age or accomplishment, or simply be in the process of maturation and deepening. You’ve gone as far as you can go according to your limited physical understanding of one phase, and you’re on the brink of developing your own sixth sense. ( My Favourite Topic of Training )

Take the time to understand where you’ve been and how your whole life has brought you to this point in time and place in the world. Nothing is accidental—after all, the same mountain on which Moses sees the burning bush is the same place where Abraham bound Isaac and where the Torah was given. So don’t take even the slightest details for granted.
Know that by answering the call, by being present in the moment of transition and being able to say “Hinneni”, you’re accomplishing more than you ever have before.

🌺💕☘️💕🌺

Inner Knowing

It is reassuring to think that we each have within us a voice that lets us know almost everything that we need to know

a voice that can help us to make the right choices and decisions, say precisely what needs to be said, and avoid travelling down the wrong paths or getting involved in the wrong things.

“If only we would listen to it!”

For it is one of the greatest gifts that we have as human beings: there are limits to our reasoning, and that is where our instinct comes into play.

Jack London spoke of it in his story, “To Build a Fire.” Here, a man uses reason to try to survive temperatures of 75 degrees below zero, but eventually dies.

However, his dog, whose instinct tells him he should not be out there, survives. 

Pay attention to “the voice within” you; it is speaking, but you must listen.

When you pray, listen for the responses to your prayers.

When you talk, listen what is said in return.

It will require practice and patience, yet the result of your diligence will be a much greater understanding of your purpose and meaning in life. 

Day 15~ The sensation of Oneness from my whatsap session

Our senses are indeed our doors and windows, the key to the unlocking of meaning and the wellspring of creativity.

Though many know only 5 senses but actually there are 9…

I AM unlocking the meaning of Life, living my connection to the whole through the wondrous sensations that surround me.

Tap into the Intuitive Powers Now 🌺

www.insightsandgrowth.com

Laila Ahmed

9820250409

Ask and Answered

When it comes to persistence, few things compare to a child nagging and negotiating to try and get what he wants. And few people know that better than a parent who has given that child an answer they don’t want to hear.

From the famed “Are we there yet?” to this morning’s “Can I have ice cream for breakfast?” to this afternoon’s “Can I have ice cream for dinner?” kids are notorious for their one-track minds, and they will ask…and ask…and ask…just in case you’ve changed your mind in the last minute.

Child nagging is a learned behavior that children of any age can pick up. They might continue to use it because once, in a moment of weakness, you caved and let them stay up an extra half hour after they asked for the eighth time.

But like any learned behavior, child nagging can be unlearned. The solution comes from Lynn Lott, co-author of the Positive Discipline series of books, and it works on kids as young as two or three, all the way through their teens.

It only takes three simple words: “Asked and Answered.”

The concept is simple. When seven-year-old Daniel begs to dig a giant hole in the front yard and gets “no” for an answer, chances are he’ll be back in five minutes asking again – this time with a “pleeeeeeaase” just so you know he really, really wants to dig the hole.

Instead of repeating yourself or jumping in to a lecture, avoid child nagging by getting eye to eye and follow the process below:

Step One: Ask, “Have you ever heard of ‘Asked and Answered’?” (He’ll probably say no.)

Step Two: Ask, “Did you ask me a question about digging a hole?” (He’ll say yes.)

Step Three: Ask, “Did I answer it?” (He’ll probably say, “Yes, but, I really ….”)

Step Four: Ask, “Do I look like the kind of mom/dad/teacher who will change her/his mind if you ask me the same thing over and over?” (Chances are Daniel will walk away, maybe with a frustrated grunt, and engage in something else.)

Step Five: If Daniel asks again, simply say, “Asked and Answered.” (No other words are necessary!) Once this technique has been established, these are the only words you should need to say to address nagging questions.

Consistency is key! Once you decide to use “Asked and Answered” with your nagging child, be sure to stick to it. If 14-year-old Emma is particularly determined to keep asking to get her eyebrow pierced, stay strong.

Answering her question again – or worse yet, changing your answer – will reinforce to her that her nagging works. Although it’ll take some patience, your child will eventually connect the dots and you’ll see results!

Make “Asked and Answered” a joint effort with your spouse, and consider including any family or friends who may have to deal with child nagging and negotiating from your child. When Daniel and Emma realize that they won’t get a “yes,” even after they’ve asked twelve times, they’ll get the hint and retire this tactic.

Speech and Language Pathologist, Stacy Pulley reports this technique works well for children with communication challenges, particularly those with Autism. She suggests bringing a notebook or a chalk/dry erase board into the mix and writing down a question once they’ve asked it more than once, keeping in mind their reading level. Or, draw a picture.

Then, when your child asks again, point to the board or notebook to remind them that they’ve asked, and you’ve answered. Be sure to use as few words as possible and stay consistent in your language to help them understand the connection as they learn to listen to and respect your answers.

Adding this tool to your parenting toolbox is a positive step toward ending the child nagging and negotiating that can wear on even the most resolute of parents.

Then, be sure to follow through and stay consistent – and before you know it, 20 questions will be a fun game once again, and no longer a negotiation tactic!